Snippets From A Fast-Changing World

An independent observer looks at things differently to someone who is right in the middle.

The app divide between casual readers and news junkies

By Andrew Phelps

Can a single app please both casual news readers and news junkies?

That’s the question I found myself asking upon rereading that report from a couple weeks ago on iPad users’ reactions to The Daily.

The report was put together by knowDigital, a division of market-research firm Coleman Insights, which asked more than 40 iPad owners to download The Daily and use it for two weeks. Sam Milkman, the head of knowDigital, interviewed participants afterward, and he found that even in a group that small, the needs of users were split...more

The newsonomics of the digital cafeteria

By Ken Doctor

Here’s how newspapers sell what they do to would-be readers.

You can get the whole paper, now sometimes including digital access. We’ll sell you Sunday only, or the weekend, or 7-day, but you have to take our whole paper. That’s what we sell; that’s our one-size-fits-all product. It fit your grandparents and your parents, so why shouldn’t it fit you?

If newspapers were in the restaurant business, they’d be out of business quite quickly. That’s not much of a menu. There’s practically no à la carte, other than single copy, which is again the whole thing, but just once. It’s prix fixe, with early-bird specials for introductory signups...more

Bing’s new iPad app is a newspaper in disguise

by Damon KiesowPublished Apr. 11, 2011 Updated Apr. 12, 2011

Microsoft’s new Bing iPad app, released Thursday, does more than search — it begins to remake the newspaper experience in digital form.

The app is not being marketed as a news platform, but journalists should consider it one because it offers a great local information utility for the iPad age...more

Paywall or no paywall, print is still what pays

Peter Preston The Observer, Sunday 20 March 2011

The New York Times’s model for online charging will no doubt be widely copied. But according to one analyst, print will still be providing 86% of UK newspapers’ revenues even in 2017.

So, at long, long last, we have the paywall policy all Americannewspapers – and many others around the globe – have been waiting for. Get the New York Times delivered at home and you receive internet access free. But eschew print and visit the website more than 20 times a month and you’ll be charged $15 or $20 or $35 a month according to the number of bells and whistles (tablets, smartphones etc) you opt for.…more

Selling Video Scoops Online

Citizenside, other websites collect and syndicate amateur videos to professional news groups
By MAX COLCHESTER

PARIS—French website Citizenside recently sold a grainy video of British fashion designer John Galliano conducting an anti-Semitic rant to news organizations around the world.

Mr. Galliano lost his job, and Citizenside pocketed a six-figure bounty.

This was just the latest scoop for the Paris-based company which is one of several websites that collect and syndicate amateur videos to professional news organizations. Citizenside says it sold the Galliano clip for more than €100,000, or about $139,000...more

Bob Woodward: ‘You get the truth at night, the lies during the day’

by Mallary Jean Tenore Published Mar. 15, 2011 6:34 pm Updated Mar. 16, 2011 9:56 am

During a visit to Poynter on Tuesday, Bob Woodward talked about Watergate’s original code name, why he likes his iPad, and the best time of day to access hard-to-reach sources.

Below, I’ve highlighted his thoughts on these topics and others. The quotes are drawn from two talks Woodward gave at Poynter and a one-on-one interview I had with him...more

The State of the News Media 2011

By Tom Rosenstiel and Amy Mitchell of the Project for Excellence in Journalism

By several measures, the state of the American news media improved in 2010.

After two dreadful years, most sectors of the industry saw revenue begin to recover. With some notable exceptions, cutbacks in newsrooms eased. And while still more talk than action, some experiments with new revenue models began to show signs of blossoming.

Among the major sectors, only newspapers suffered continued revenue declines last year—an unmistakable sign that the structural economic problems facing newspapers are more severe than those of other media. When the final tallies are in, we estimate 1,000 to 1,500 more newsroom jobs will have been lost—meaning newspaper newsroomsare 30% smaller than in 2000.…more

Japan Quake Shows the Limits of User-Generate Content

by Erik Sass

One of the big promises of the digital age was that journalism would be transformed by an army of amateur videographers – namely, all of us regular citizens – who might just happen to be nearby when something important goes down. And it’s true this kind of user-generate content has provided some pretty amazing scoops and footage from incidents which might otherwise have been missed by “real” TV news outfits: some of the most alarming video I have ever seen is amateur, close-up footage of tornadoes (I mean really close-up – way closer than any professional news outfit would get). But it’s also clear that the close-up perspective of the random passer-by just can’t compete with professionals when it comes to certain types of events...more

Kara Swisher, Michael Arrington, and me: New conflicts, and new opportunities, for the tech press

By Tim Carmody

Changing technology is changing journalism in more ways than we can probably even understand. One of those changes concerns the definitions of “journalist” and “journalism” themselves, the question of who’s permitted to make or contest those definitions, and the other question of whether those lines are fair to draw in the first place....more